Saturday, May 21

‘Watch what they watch’

Psychologist Lubna Arif talks about the ill effects of watching cable television


Cable is an industry now and a large number of people are involved in this sector. About the ill effect caused by cable television, she say:
"The cable television does affect the human psyche, but it cannot be termed as a major influence in most of the cases though one can find a lot of cases where the cable television has adversely affected the human mind to a large extent – especially late night viewing can be dangerous where one is watching the television without any disturbance. One of the major effects is on the routine of the students and office-going persons.
"Watching pornographic movies or any other such programmes can increase the libido; and if one does not find an outlet, he or she is definitely disturbed and will end up in some mental hospital or remain disturbed. Such contradictions destroy the personality of a person. How? On one hand, the cable television is widening the mental horizons and on the other, the society and family do not allow them to transgress the moral and ethical limits. Restriction is useful, but without proper education, it can be dangerous too.
"Abnormality starts with conflict. As long as an individual is able to cope with it, it is fine; but when he fails to do so, he becomes abnormal. The cable can deteriorate a person’s mental health. I believe an abnormal person will suffer if he is provided with cable sans proper education.
"Look at young females! They are trying to be television and film actresses in their daily lives. The closed-doors television viewing aggravates this. It all starts with fascination, then it moves to hallucination; and the next stop is mental hospital.
"The domestic environment has a lot to do with such an abnormality. The parents must be there to stop this. Put your television in the ‘open’ where there is a risk of any family member’s intrusion at any time of the day. They must work hard on their kids. The best policy is to control it as you cannot stop this."

5 comments:

BaptizedLucifer said...

the fact that someone out ther ein pakistan is syaing this out loud is awesome enuf.

speaking/discussing openly has almost always been taboo is most desi families. theyre either too shy or too scared to face questions asked by kidz. so they opt for the worst possible action: avoidance. first they say NO to everythign without reasoning making a very sensible young child feel he/she is being treated like an idiot thus angering him/her. Then, even tho they know there child is confused and has lots of questions to ask when they are going thru adolescense, they act all ignorant towards this. the poor kidz wont dare ask their parents anything for fear of being punished... theres more distance and anger...

some are left disturbed and distant form their families forever... others just end up under wrong influence.

kidz growing up in families where communication is easy arent necessarily any smarter than the rest... they dont automatically make the best ethical/moral decisions... they are just more mentally stable.

or something like that...

Aamer Waqas Ghaus Chaudhary said...

Communication and putting oneself in kids' shoes are of huge importance. When I see young kids, never settling even for a few peaceful moments, makes me see in them a huge reservoir of energy and yearning to do something.
Plus their ever-changing mental state... they are consuming so much without any proper outlets. I am referring to their physiological needs which are never reciprocated in the society, but they are constantly bombarded with 'physical overtures'. It causes disasters. Mere physical attchments seem to them 'true love'
and real parents become 'villains'.
And... the list goes on!

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